This website calculates how much toilet roll you actually need during the coronavirus pandemic

Greg Evans
Monday 23 March 2020 14:45
Viral
(iStock)

If we had to make a prediction of things that would have happened in 2020, toilet paper becoming a scarce commodity would have definitely not been one of them.

However, due to the coronavirus outbreak, we have witnessed unprecedented scenes where supermarkets have been completely cleared out of toilet roll leaving many, across various countries, with no loo roll in their houses.

The hoarding has really brought out the worst in society but hopefully, this wave of panic buying is over as people have presumably stocked up on all they need to have clean backsides well into next year.

Given that some folks have an unprecedented amount of loo roll available to them, it may be time to start practising sensible rationing of toilet roll per person. But how does one do that?

Well, to get an idea of how much we should actually be using, a new website has been developed which will tell you how many days' worth of toilet roll you have left, depending on your current supply.

HowMuchToiletPaper.Com asks users, who aren't shy, to declare how many rolls of paper they have and how many times per day they make a trip to the bathroom.

Picture: How Much Toilet Paper(roll)

Advanced options let users share how many wipes they usually use, how many sheets per wipe, sheets on a roll, people in a household and how many days of quarantine they have planned.

Picture: How Much Toilet Paper(How Much Toilet Paper)

The website was created by London-based student software developer Ben Sassoon and artist Sam Harris, and is based on how much paper they use on a day-to-day basis and how that could change during the pandemic, as the average person now has 500 per cent more toilet paper than they would usually have.

Obviously, things are different for different people and different households with different requirements but hopefully, resources like this will help people be a bit more considerate during the pandemic and in the future, when this entire thing is over.

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