Just Eat has a completely different name in Australia and Brits can’t get their heads around it

Harriet Brewis
Tuesday 30 March 2021 09:38
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Regional differences are common among brands. Walker’s crisps are called Lay’s across Europe, Rice Crispies are called Rice Bubbles in New Zealand, and T.K. Mazz is called T.J. Maxx in the US.

Yet, Twitter was not quite prepared for the Australian name for Just Eat.

Users were alerted to the difference thanks to English writer Rae Earl, who posted a clip of the widely-viewed advert for the delivery service, featuring Snoop Dogg.

In it, the hiphop veteran raps about various takeaway favourites, before asking: “Did somebody say Just Eat?”

However, in the version shared by Earl, there is a key difference.

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“What Just Eat is called in Australia defies description…,” she wrote alongside the video.

This time, Snoop asks: “Did somebody say… Menulog?”

Her tweet, posted on Monday, has garnered more than 1,700 comments, with users bowled over by the cloying alternative.

One wrote: “I saw this last year and I have been unable to get it out my head. Did he record 2 versions? Does he know it sounds like a menu s***? I need a therapy group for this.”

Another commented: “This lives rent free in my head. I’ve been walking around the house randomly bursting out with did somebody sayyy menulogggg for weeks now. ITS JUSTEATTTTT."

While another weighed in: ‘”It gets worse! Look what they call Burger King.”

Others defended the disparity, with one explaining: “It’s called Menulog here because it was already a company before Just Eat purchased it. They probably couldn’t be f***ed to rebrand since it was already one of the biggest delivery companies in Australia.”

Another bemused user asked: “Wait, it's not called Menulog everywhere else?”

While another said: “I live in Australia and totally accepted it until you pointed out the obvious.

“Still... decent advertising budget.”

Just Eat bought the Sydney-based food ordering platform Menulog for around £445 million back in 2015, marking its expansion into Australia and New Zealand.

Little did they know how many minds would be blown by their decision to keep the app’s original name...

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