What the Dalai Lama told Glastonbury

His appearance infuriated the Chinese government, but the Dalai Lama has given a message of peace and compassion at the Glastonbury.

Thousands of people waited in the rain at the festival's Stone Circle to hear the exiled Tibetan Buddhist leader speak for around half an hour on a simple wooden stage.

After being greeted by a premature rendition of Happy Birthday to You a week ahead of his 80th birthday, the Dalai Lama called on governments to spend less on arms and more on fighting poverty.

On inequality, he said:

It's not just morally wrong but also it's a practical problem.

Although he did not specifically name Isis, he said violence in Iraq and Syria was "unthinkable".

"The worst thing [about] the conflict is the killing of others in the name of faith," he said, adding that all major religions had a message of "love and tolerance and fairness".

The Dalai Lama, who wore a festival T-shirt over his head to fend off the rain, praised Glastonbury as a "festival of people, not governments or politicians".

He added:

While you are here, enjoy the joyfulness here. But you should remember on this same planet are human beings being killed by human beings.

More: The Chinese government is absolutely furious about Glastonbury this year

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