Scientists believe they have invented ice cream that doesn't melt

Louis Dor
Tuesday 01 September 2015 11:50
Science and Tech

Ice cream is about to get a whole lot better, thanks to science.

Researchers at the Universities of Edinburgh and Dundee have discovered a naturally occurring protein that can be used to create ice cream that is much more resistant to melting.

It binds together the air fat and water in the ice cream, leading to a super-smooth consistency.

It also can be made with lower levels of saturated fat and fewer calories than is currently found in ice cream.

The ingredient would also keep the product frozen for longer, potentially making deliveries and shipping easier as well as cheaper.

The only catch? This new, glorious ice-cream could be available within three to five years.

So what is this wondrous sorcery?

The new protein, which occurs naturally in some foods, could be produced via a new method using friendly bacteria and sustainable raw materials.

The protein, known as BsIA, works by binding to droplets of fat and air bubbles, to make a more stable, smoother consistency in the mixture.

Professor Cait MacPhee of the University of Edinburgh, said:

We’re excited by the potential this new ingredient has for improving ice cream, both for consumers and for manufacturers.

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