White House Press Secretary Jen Psaki matter-of-factly rebuffed an anti-abortion reporter who repeatedly grilled her as to how President Joe Biden, as a Catholic, could support a woman’s right to choose.

The question was likely in reference to the president’s repeated public condemnation of Texas’ radical abortion law.

The journalist involved was Owen Jensen, the White House correspondent for EWNT — The Eternal Word Television Network — a Catholic basic cable network in the United States. “Why does the president support abortion when his own Catholic faith teaches abortion is morally wrong?” Jensen inquired.

“He believes that it’s a woman’s right, it’s her body, and it’s her choice,” Psaki said in reply.

Jensen, seemingly dissatisfied with this explanation, followed up: “Why does the president…who does he believe should look out for the unborn child?”

“He believes that it’s up to a woman to make those decisions,” Psaki reiterated. “And up to a woman to make those decisions with her doctor.”

“I know you’ve never faced those choices, nor have you ever been pregnant, but for women out there who have faced those choices? This is an incredibly difficult thing,” Psaki added. “The president believes that right should be respected.”

Jensen attempted to follow up again, but Psaki accepted another query. “Go ahead, I think we gotta move on,” she told another reporter, asserting that Jensen had “plenty of time today.” (Not to mention that the majority of Catholics in the United States believe abortion should be legal.)

The abortion law went into effect in Texas on Wednesday, prohibiting abortion once medical professionals can “detect a heartbeat” from the fetus. This usually falls around six weeks of pregnancy — before most people even realise they’re pregnant.

What’s more, the controversial motion encourages citizens to pursue legal action against anyone who might possibly be involved with terminating a pregnancy after that point. This can mean anyone from doctors to friends to Uber drivers innocently — and unknowingly — transporting people to their abortion appointments after the six week mark. Citizens who win thee lawsuits can be rewarded up to $10,000 while those “involved” — unwittingly or otherwise — will ultimately be penalised.

In most states and countries wherein abortion is legal, people can get abortions until around 24 weeks. In some states, like New York, The Reproductive Health acts allows for abortions past that mark if someone’s life or health is at risk, or if the fetus is unviable.

Many pro-choice activists and politicians see the restrictive Texas law as the end of abortion rights as we know them, setting a dangerous precent for the rest of the country.

“Abortion access will be thrown into absolute chaos,” Amanda Williams, executive director of the abortion support group the Lilith Fund, told The Guardian. “Unfortunately, many people who need access the most will slip through the cracks, as we have seen over the years with the relentless attacks here in our state. It is unbelievable that Texas politicians have gotten away with this devastating and cruel law that will harm so many.”

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