Today (26th November) is Black Friday and many retailers and services are offering big discounts.

But on a day that encourages consumerism, some people are taking part in ‘Buy Nothing Day’ – a day when people literally buy nothing as a way of being sustainable in the face of consumption.

Instead, in the fight against overconsumption, Buy Nothing Day encourages people to do the complete opposite of what companies want them to do on Black Friday.

The official website explains: “It’s a 24-hour detox from consumerism and an opportunity for you to tune into the impact we have on the environment through shopping.

“People around the world will make a pact with themselves to take a break from consumption as a personal experiment or public statement, and the best thing is - IT’S FREE!!!”

Sign up to our new free Indy100 weekly newsletter

Buy Nothing Day was founded in the early 90s by Adbusters and has since grown in popularity given what we now know about our impact on the environment through consumerism.

The international initiative is embraced by 50 countries around the world, with some independent retailers choosing to close altogether.

One independently-owned bookstore in Ottawa, Canada, has closed its doors for the day in honour of the cause.

Other people online are also embracing it and asking others to do the same.

One person wrote: “November 26th — Buy nothing — Stay home — Stay strong

It’s time we bow out of it - create the world we want to live in.

“Buy Nothing. Stay at home if you can. Take a packed lunch if you can’t. Resist consumer pressure for 24 hours. #BuyNothingDay #BoycottBlackFriday.”

Former MP Catherine Rowett wrote: “There are many reasons to boycott Amazon on #BuyNothingDay, but here are a few reasons to stand with their workers and protest at the company’s appalling record as an employer.”

Someone else said: “Remember: it’s not a good deal if you don’t need it.”

Another wrote: “Consumerism is fueling unsustainable societies, causing huge inequality and driving environmental degradation.”

Please log in or register to upvote this article
The Conversation (0)