Here’s a scenario the scientists didn’t think of: if a vaccine for Covid-19 fails to be developed, it’ll be fine regardless.

Why?

Because the virus will get bored and just “leave”.

At least that’s the brilliant new theory put forward by Donald Trump at his most recent briefing.

First he mused on the possibility of no vaccine and the virus disappearing, commenting:

If [we] don't have the vaccine, if the virus is gone, we're like we were before, but having a vaccine would be a great thing.

Obviously, this raised some questions about just where exactly the virus would be going (on a short holiday to Europe? A backpacking tour round east Asia?).

When pressed by a reporter on why Trump thought the virus would be “gone” without the presence of a vaccine, he shrugged and offered up an answer that was breathtaking in its nonchalant ignorance.

It’s gonna go, it’s gonna leave. It’s gonna be gone. It’s gonna be eradicated, it might take longer, it might be in smaller sections. It won’t be what we had.

Trump then rambled about “burning embers”, referring to pockets of outbreaks.

If you have a flare-up in certain areas, I call them burning embers, boom! We put it out, we know how to put it out now. Now we’re equipped.

The US recently passed the bleak milestone of one million recorded coronavirus cases.

People were naturally sceptical of Trump’s claim, especially given it echoed comments the president made in March, predicting the virus would “disappear” once warmer weather began in April.

This, of course, did not occur.

Political commentator Bryan Taylor Cohen slammed Trump for “[repeating] the past”.

Others jokingly (well, sort of) begged the media to stop treating him with respect.

And some wearily reminded everyone to add this new claim to the list of ridiculous Trump statements to remember during the election period.

Maybe coronavirus will just disappear.

After all, it's probably as fed up with Trump's nonsense as we all are.

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