<p>“All I tried to do was to use my platform to spread positivity, fun - you know, during such uncertain times, which has now led to me being upset”</p>

“All I tried to do was to use my platform to spread positivity, fun - you know, during such uncertain times, which has now led to me being upset”

TikTok

You may recognise Welsh postwoman, Laura Orgill, from her recent viral TikTok video which has since racked up 1.6M views. It shows her posting a Royal Mail ‘sorry, we missed you’ note through someone’s letterbox just a few seconds after knocking.

​In the video captioned, ‘When customers take ages to answer the door 😅 #TikTokPostie’, the 26-year-old postie used one of TikTok’s trending sounds to make light of a British stereotype that Royal Mail posties don’t wait for long enough after attempting to deliver a parcel.

The original video reached over 1.5M views The original video reached over 1.5M views TikTok

​The majority of people took the video in good humour - one even mocked the Royal Mail competitor, Hermes: “It’s a good job you don’t work for Hermes. The parcel would end up on a neighbour’s roof”.

While another joked, “It’s not funny when this happens... But this is funny!”

Unfortunately, there were a few that were clearly triggered by the video. One said, “It doesn’t look good on the company I’d never post in uniform - wouldn’t surprise me if disciplinary.”

What was intended to be a funny and light-hearted video, the backlash prompted Laura to do a follow-up video. An upset Laura took to her 746K followers with a TikTok captioned, ‘Telling my side of the story. Now let’s get back to work’, to defend the innocent video.

Laura felt the need to defend the original TikTok, after some took the humorous video the wrong way Laura felt the need to defend the original TikTok, after some took the humorous video the wrong way TikTok

She said: “All I did was use a trending sound and try and think of a funny scenario that people think the posties do. Unfortunately, people have taken it seriously.”

She made it clear that the video had no malicious intentions and just wanted to play around with a longstanding stereotype.

“All I tried to do was to use my platform to spread positivity, fun - you know, during such uncertain times, which has now led to me being upset”, she added.

“All the charity work I’ve done, all through the last year used my platform for good, raising over £10,000 for Cancer Research UK - that doesn’t once hit national news, but someone taking my video the wrong way does”, she said before thanking everyone for their ‘love and support’.

You can watch the full video here.

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