These Chinese medics have come to help the NHS 'combat' coronavirus, but some people aren't happy

Louis Staples
Tuesday 31 March 2020 08:00
news

A video circulating on social media appears to show medical staff arriving from China to help with the UK response to the coronavirus crisis.

A clip posted on Twitter looks as though it shows several staff unloading equipment from a coach in London. The Telegraph reports that the medical professionals from Shandong Province arrived in London over the weekend. According to Chinese state media, the 15-strong group includes experts on disease prevention, as well as traditional Chinese and Western medicine.

The footage was shared by Tory politician Samantha Harvey, the country’s first Chinese-born UK district councillor, who is based in Wakefield.

The video has since been viewed thousands of times, with lots of people praising the medics.

Many people also criticised China’s response to the pandemic and others expressed concerns that the video is “propaganda” for China’s government.

Responding to a tweet about why the media apparently weren't covering the video, the BBC's Andrew Neil said more answers are needed before praising the move.

... And sadly there’s a lot of blatantly racist comments too, which we won't repeat or amplify.

But this is really surprising seeing as President Trump has spent weeks calling Covid-19 “China virus” at every opportunity? Probably not.

Britain isn't the only country to be visited by Chinese doctors, with medics also being sent to Italy and Spain in recent weeks. The medics carried boxes with the Chinese flag alongside the Union Jack printed on the side, with the phrases “We will get through this together!” and “Keep calm and combat coronavirus”, which people found amusing to say the least…

The apparent outreach comes as China appears to be emerging on the other side of its own outbreak, with Chinese authorities ending the strict two-month lockdown in Wuhan last week, where the outbreak originated. But coronavirus has since spread to over 200 countries, so there’s plenty more work to be done to “flatten the curve” across the world.

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