How David Cameron changed his tune on the debates

Matthew Champion@matthewchampion
Friday 06 March 2015 10:20
news

David Cameron has faced condemnation from across the political spectrum after refusing to take part in a head-to-head debate with Ed Miliband in the build-up to the general election.

The prime minister's team said they would only be willing to participate in one debate, held this month, featuring the leaders of the seven main parties in Britain; broadcasters want to hold three debates in total, two with the seven leaders and one with just Cameron and Miliband.

i paper editor Oliver Duff has called on broadcasters to "hold their nerve and 'empty chair' the prime minister".

We deserve the chance to see our leaders go head-to-head. The broadcasters' plan was reasonable, giving us – the paying, voting public – the chance to see all seven major party leaders twice, with an extra discussion between the two men who could be prime minister come 8 May, David Cameron and Ed Miliband.

The debates would allow us to reach better-informed decisions about who we're choosing to govern us. They would bring drama and spontaneity to stale, sanitised, stage-managed campaigning. Our democracy needs it.

Labour has accused Cameron of "cowering from the public", and has produced a new video highlighting the fact that the PM has considerably changed his mind when it comes to the importance of debates.

In opposition he was all for them, but in power, less so. Funny that. See how Cameron's position has changed below:

2010 v 2015

2008 v 2015

2010 v 2015

And here's Labour's video highlighting the change of heart:

More: [Forget the leaders' debates. We're all about this Budget rap battle]1

Trending