Howard Stern had some very bizarre advice for Ellen DeGeneres as cancellation rumours swirl
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American radio personality Howard Stern said that if he were in Ellen Degeneres’ shoes, he would rethink his entire image.

Known in the past for doing antagonistic celebrity interviews, Stern gave DeGeneres advice on how he would handle the controversy surrounding claims that her show fostered a toxic work environment.

He said on his SiriusXM radio show the Howard Stern Show: "You know what I’d do if I was Ellen? I would change my whole image. I’d go on the air and be a son of a b****... people would come on and (I would) go, "F*** you." Just be a p****."

The 66-year-old — who feuded with DeGeneres for years — continued to say that while finds her likeable on a personal level, he has no idea what it is like to work for her.

Stern and DeGeneres have now been friends for some time — he even remarried his wife Beth on The Ellen DeGeneres Show in 2019 — made his “rebranding” suggestion with the caveat that he thinks DeGeneres should initially try and work things out with her staff.

Stern also said that he and DeGeneres actually have an opposite situation as far as their reputations go.

He said, "I’m known on the air as a pr***, but off the air, I’m known as a great guy, you know, for the most part."

The two have had somewhat irrelevant American Idol-related drama in the past, and in 2010 Stern called Ellen “a jerk” and a “tyrant ogre.”

They have now seemed to reconcile, as last year the two made waves as they shared an on-air kiss during Stern's first ever appearance on DeGeneres's chat show in the program's 16-year history.

Stern's comments come as viewership for Ellen appears to have been hit hard amid claims that the work culture behind-the-scenes has been rife with bullying, despite the “be kind” mantra DeGeneres presents on the hugely popular TV series.

The allegations culminated this past July, whenBuzzFeed published a story who interviewed former Ellen show employees who alleged a toxic environment of “racism, fear, and intimidation.”

While Stern suggests leaning into this bad public image, as he seems to have done over the years, we can’t imagine it would go over very well.

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