In the wake of Black Lives Matter, brands have scrambled to respond adequately.

Perhaps aware that the concept of ‘capitalism’ is taking quite the beating right now, many are flailing with how to start taking concrete action, beyond a statement and a few donations.

Internal corrective initiatives to deal with racism will take years.

But there are things businesses can do in the meantime; which is why a new advert from multinational corporation Proctor & Gamble (which own brands like Olay, Pantene and Febreze) is being praised for its clear-eyed analysis of racial bias.

The ad, which is being aired in the US, was posted to Twitter by a user with the handle. @DopeDope_UUUU.

Alongside, they wrote: “They snapped on this commercial. No words”.

The 1.46 minute spot, titled “The Look” depicts a Black man going about his daily business; walking down the street with his son and teaching him how to swim, trying to catch an elevator and entering a jewellery store.

In all these scenarios, he’s given a “look” by white individuals around him; a mother rolls up her window after “the look”, a man closes the elevator door before the Black protagonist can get in and a security guard follows him around the store after exchanging a “look” with a retail worker.

The “look”, obviously, is meant to represent a moment of racially-charged judgement, when people’s racial bias informs their actions.

At the end, the Black man is seen walking into a courtroom, where it’s revealed he is a judge.

And while some interpreted his job as a comment of never knowing what people do, others had more insightful take.

Because of course, it doesn’t matter if you’re a judge or a hospital cleaner; racism still isn’t warranted.

The point of the main character being a judge was, said some people, to highlight the need for impartiality – which of course is what judges are supposed to represent.

Others praised the commercial in general and its depiction of microaggressions.

Some said the commercial would help people recognise their unconscious bias.

P&G were even praised for using their platform to spread the message.

Of course, people disagreed, including those who pointed out the criminal justice system isn’t exactly free from bias itself.

And some just dismissed the entire thing.

Well, one advert isn’t going to solve racism.

But maybe it’s worth a watch…

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