Shine/Tonikstudio
Shine/Tonikstudio

"I can't even." You might say it from time to time when life gets stressful.

Perhaps you dropped your eggs on the way home, or a hotly anticipated Tinder date turned out to be a 53-year-old man called Jeff who wants to Netflix and chill before you've even started on your spicy rice.

At times, we all need a little lift, a boost of buoyancy to guide us through such times of woe.

Shine is a new app that hopes to help combat such strife. It sends users positive vibes in the form of morning text messages whenever they desire, messages of inspiration, advice, or just happy thoughts.

Texts come at 8.30am, and are designed to feel like they're coming from a supportive friend.

We know some days you feel awesome and others not-so-much. We curate and send daily content that empowers you to slay your day and feel your best self.

Your daily Shine text includes positive affirmations, tactical actions you can do that day and the occasional gif. Trust us, it'll give you all the feels before you even get out of bed.

For example:

The service launched this week and is aimed at giving millennials some thoughts to consider before they start their day. You know, 'it's not all bad, mate,' but with a little more refinement and consideration.

Shine was started by Naomi Hirabayashi and Marah Lidey. They left their jobs at dosomething.org last year to pursue what was originally a side project.

Shine/ Marc Fusco

The pair told Mashable:

Millennials are increasingly seeking ways to connect with themselves and set their days and their lives up for success. It's called intentional living and they are all about it.

We had working sessions every weekday morning (hello, 6 a.m. Google Hangout) and every weeknight, as well as Sunday working sessions at our apartments. One Sunday, months before we knew we had funding, we took an extra long gulp of rosé and said 'let's do this.'

Shine isn't just motivational, it also has mental health in mind. Hirabayashi and Lidey want users to feel happier, healthier, and more encouraged about their lives.

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