<p>Users were baffled when their X-rated images were still there the following day</p>

Users were baffled when their X-rated images were still there the following day

AFP via Getty Images

Twitter announced last month that their divisive feature ‘Fleets’ would be non-existent as of August 3. The new feature was likened to Instagram and Snapchat stories which let users post photos and videos that disappeared after 24 hours.

As the ‘Fleets’ countdown began, Twitter users rushed to the social media site to leave their lasting legacy – some in the form of nudes.

People around the globe united in sin, believing that their explicit pics would be deleted from the internet for good by midnight.

But, in a shocking turn of events, they weren’t. By the time users woke up, the Twitter function remained alive and well, and so did their images for the world to see.

As always, the reactions were priceless. People took to Twitter in hysterics over the mishap.

One said, “If I posted nudes yesterday and woke up to these fleets still sitting above my feed, it’d be full-on panic time”, while another shocked user picked an unfortunate day to discover the function, “The one day I click on fleets.”

Twitter announced the arrival of ‘Fleets’ in March 2020 after the success of Instagram and Snapchat stories. Initially trialled by a small group of users in Brazil, the ‘Fleets’ platform soon expanded to other parts of the world.

Currently, there is no official way to automatically delete old tweets after a certain time, so users who want this feature need to rely on third-party tools. Starting today, Twitter will make “Fleets” available to a limited amount of users, so they can share text, photos, and videos that will be available on their profile for only 24 hours.

Beykpour said the idea came after some users shared that they feel intimidated to post certain things because they have no control over the visibility of the content.”

Twitter has since advised users to update their app to the latest version if Fleets are still visible.

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