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If you're appalled by what's going on in Aleppo here are six ways you can help

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Today we've heard that the Syrian army is resuming military operations in Aleppo after a reported rebel infringement of the fragile ceasefire.

So far, there have been countless lives lost in the embattled Syrian city.

Yesterday the former chancellor of the exchequer, and now backbencher, George Osborne told the commons that he takes 'personal responsibility' for the atrocities in Aleppo. 

Speaking at an emergency debate in the House of Commons, the Conservative MP said:

I think we are deceiving ourselves in this Parliament if we believe that we have no responsibility for what has happened in Syria.

He went on to add:

I take responsibility as someone who sat on the national security council throughout those years. Parliament should take responsibility for what it prevented being done. There were multiple opportunities to intervene.

So what can be done now? What can someone thousands of miles away from a conflict zone do to help the people fleeing for their lives? 

Here are six things:

1. Donate to Oxfam

The quickest and easiest method to get help to where its needed in Syria is donations. Oxfam are currently running a Syria crisis appeal to provide food, shelter and support to those who need it most. 

A £35 donation could help provide housing, say the charity. While £100 could help supply life-saving water to areas and camps which require it.

Oxfam's Syria Crisis Response Manager Andy Baker said:

Oxfam is deeply concerned at reports that dozens of civilians, including women and children, have been executed in Aleppo by pro-government forces.

The government of Syria and their armed allies must ensure civilians who remain in besieged East Aleppo or have fled to government held areas are safe and their rights are respected. There must be no reprisal attacks, arbitrary detention, extrajudicial executions or disappearances under any circumstances.

You can donate to Oxfam via donate.oxfam.org.uk/emergency/syria

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2. Support Doctors Without Borders/Medicins Sans Frontieres

The tireless and incredibly heroic work of Doctors Without Borders can't be achieved without financial support from the general public. 

Today, the organisation expressed 'outrage' over the violence directed towards civilians and the "Unresponsiveness of those who can stop it".

Teresa Sancristoval, head of MSF’s emergency unit for Aleppo, commented:

We remind all sides that even war has rules. It is paramount that all parties allow people to flee to safety, allow the evacuation of the sick and wounded, and facilitate the protection of, and humanitarian assistance to, those who are caught on the front lines.

You can become a one time donor, or a regular contributor to MSF at donate.doctorswithoutborders.org/onetime.cfm

This is Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) [5 mins] from Doctors Without Borders/MSF-USA on Vimeo.

 

3. Support the White Helmets

Every day in Syria, volunteer rescue workers from the White Helmets are the first on the scene of bombings and attacks. These men and women pull people out from under the rubble and carry them to safety. 

It's estimated they have saved tens of thousands of people from the wreckage caused by bombings all over Syria. 

Money raised for the White Helmets helps get wounded workers back on their feet, support the families of fallen rescue workers and repair and replace lifesaving equipment. 

You can donate over at herofund.whitehelmets.org/donate/

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4. Support the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC)

We all know what they do and the world would be a much darker place without them. Their work, along with the Syrian Arab Red Crescent has helped support countless civilians caught up in the Syrian conflict.

This year, their team in the country has carried out 55 cross front-line operations, bringing food and essential aid to 8 million people, and clean water to millions more.

You can help them keep up that work by donating at icrc.org/en/donate/syria-crisis-appeal

 

5. Speak out on refugees' rights 

The global refugee crisis, created in part because of the conflict in Syria, is not going away anytime soon. With each day that passes, more and more families find themselves without a place to live, forced from their homes because of the fighting. 

There isn't a singular, easy solution to this, but your support and your willingness to help sends a powerful message to the Government to do something about it. 

You can voice your support for refugees with Amnesty Inernational at amnesty.org/en/get-involved

You can make a donation to Refugee Action at refugee-action.org.uk

And you can support the UN's Refugee Agency at donate.unhcr.org/gb-en/general

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6. Help the children

The fighting and war in Syria has destroyed families, as well as homes. The numbers of child refugees and children in conflict zones are staggering, and the human rights violations reportedly happening there are deeply worrying at best.

Acording to Unicef:

Children are particularly vulnerable to such violations as recruitment into armed groups, exploitation and abuse, including early marriage and child labour.

With your donations, Unicef are working to support and protect children in Syria. They're focusing on areas such as health, nutrition, immunisation, education and child protection. unicef.org.uk/donate/child-refugees

Save the Children say they have so far reached over 1 million internally displaced children and adults in Syria's south, central, northeast and northwest regions. They have been providing fresh food, new baby kits and shelters. You can donate at secure.savethechildren.org

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As George Osborne said in the Commons:

We all know the price of intervention.

We are now beginning to learn the price of not intervening.

 


More: The UN says women and children are being slaughtered in Aleppo. The Morning Star called it a 'liberation'

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