Picture: Unicef/YouTube
Picture: Unicef/YouTube

A video by UNICEF has revealed people's bias against children in poverty when they were presented with the same girl, in different clothes, left unaccompanied on the street.

The experiment was carried out in Tbilisi, Georgia. Child actor Anano stood unaccompanied on a main road. For the first half she was dressed in expensive clothing and appeared neat and clean.

Picture: UNICEF/Youtube

The video shows multiple adults stopping to help her and generally check she is all right.

Picture: UNICEF/Youtube

Picture: UNICEF/Youtube

Then UNICEF changed Anano's appearance. They dressed her in unclean clothes and used make up to make her face seem dirty.

Picture: UNICEF/Youtube

Picture: UNICEF/Youtube

When she returned to the street in her new attire, the video shows pedestrians walking by Anano, and most of them pretend not to see her.

Picture: UNICEF/Youtube

Picture: UNICEF/Youtube

UNICEF repeated the experiment in a restaurant. As before, the neatly dressed Anano received love, affection and concern from patrons who rushed to her aid.

Picture: UNICEF/Youtube

Picture: UNICEF/Youtube

Picture: UNICEF/Youtube

When she was dressed like someone living in poverty, people moved their bags closer to them and she was dismissed by customers.

Picture: UNICEF/Youtube

Picture: UNICEF/Youtube

The way people treated Anano in the restaurant was so upsetting for her that UNICEFstopped the experiment early. Speaking afterwards she said:

Because my face was covered in soot and my clothes were all dirty... this made me sad... they were all telling me to go away.

Picture: UNICEF/Youtube

Picture: UNICEF/Youtube

Watch the full video of the experiment here:

Video: UNICEF/YouTube


UNICEF stated that it planned to use its 2016 State of the World’s Children Report to call for a fair chance for every child. To follow the campaign, look for the hashtag #fightunfair.

Would you stop if you saw this little girl on the street?

Keep reading...Show less
Please log in or register to upvote this article
The Conversation (0)