The real difference between the UK and US, in one paragraph about baking

Narjas Zatat@Narjas_Zatat
Thursday 02 June 2016 13:10
discover

The Great British Bake Off has been shown on Netflix in the US for a while now, and is picking up a small but dedicated fanbase.

A few things are still confusing them though.

Specifically, they can’t seem to get their heads around the concept of a biscuit, and took to Quora for some much-needed clarification:

I was under the impression that a UK biscuit was a US cookie, but now I'm watching the Great British Baking Show on Netflix, and I'm not so sure...

British people tried to explain that proper biscuits are hard, crunchy round things usually eaten with tea.

Exhibit A:

Picture: H is for Home/Flickr

An American biscuit on the other hand, is an abomination is baked, and rises, making it look more like a bun, and they can be eaten with savoury food like cheese and bacon.

Exhibit B:

Picture: Morton Fox/Flickr

User Kelsey Hayes summed it up perfectly:

Usually in the UK a biscuit would be a cookie, like a "hard" cookie (although yes it can be broader). Think something like shortbread. Something you'd have with or dunk into your tea.

In the US a biscuit is a softer, flaky baked item made with flour, butter and lard/shortening. They can be eaten with savoury food (e.g. gravy, fried chicken) or sweet food (jam, honey and/or butter).

Considering how much angst this has caused, we probably shouldn't tell them about the Jaffa Cake debate just yet.

More: 11 things Britain does better than America

More: Americans try to pronounce UK place names

Trending