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A California-based gynaecologist is planning an abortion boat to avoid state restrictions.

Dr Meg Autry had been thinking about the genius idea for years after witnessing more threats towards terminations. Mississippi riverboat casinos inspired her as a child, which prompted her toward the concept of a floating abortion clinic.

"I was constantly thinking about, 'What are some innovative and creative ways that we could provide access?'" she told Insider.

Determined to help women in need of abortion access, the OBGYN is not naive to the security concerns of patients.

"We know how dangerous it is for patients and providers," she told the publication, adding that the idea has been well-received by "heartwarming" support as they move forward with the plan.

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Initially, she planned to have the floating clinic on the Mississippi River, but this soon was stopped in its tracks as it would come with severe legal restrictions.

The idea is to set up the clinic in the Gulf of Mexico after the Supreme Court overturned Roe V Wade in June. This would serve people in Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, and Florida.

"This is potentially the quickest, closest option for some of those patients," Dr Autry said.

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She is now seeking funding to purchase the boat and to fit it with medical equipment under the non-profit PRROWESS or Protecting Reproductive Rights Of Women Endangered by State Statutes.

Once the first stage is complete, she hopes the clinic will be up and running within a year once it meets clinical and maritime standards.

On July 24, the decision to overturn the right to abortion came to fruition with nearly half the states issuing near-total bans on abortion.

In the 6-3 majority to strip women's rights to abortion, Justice Samuel Alito wrote, "Abortion presents a profound moral issue on which Americans hold sharply conflicting views." At least 25 states now have to introduce new laws or revive old ones to restrict access to terminations.

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