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Yes, we all know that the nation is divided over Brexit and all that, but what about that other time-long debate - the pronunciation of 'scone'.

Now, Reddit user Bezzleford has created a handy map that shows how different people pronounce the afternoon-time snack in different parts of the country.

If you don't live under a rock but you do live in the United Kingdom, chances are you will have come across the debate at one time or another.

Essentially, some people pronounce scone to rhyme with 'cone', while others pronounce it to rhyme with 'gone'.

Here, Bezzleford outlines who says it how, where:

Speaking to Brilliant Maps, the creator elaborated:

Anyone from the UK knows that the no.1 cause of family feuds is over the pronunciation of 'scone' (except maybe what kind of treat this is or the great dinner vs. tea debate).

The data was collected by Cambridge university and managed to map the pronunciation of scone across the UK and Ireland.

Scone rhyming with gone is almost universal in Scotland whereas in England it’s a lot more controversial.

According to wiki Canadians and Australians also pronounce them rhyming with 'gone' but I’d like to hear what other people have to say.

Americans apparently pronounce them rhyming with 'cone'.

For anyone outside the UK a 'scone' is a small bread/cake which is baked and lightly sweetened.

Some people have compared them to the American word for 'biscuit' but the two are very different in texture and how they’re eaten.

While a biscuit is usually flaky and often eaten savoury, a scone is sweet, dense, crumbly and often served with butter or traditionally cream and strawberries.

I personally pronounce it rhyming with 'cone' even though my parents say it rhymes with 'gone'.

This is inline with statistics that show younger people tend to pronounce is rhyming with 'cone' rather than 'gone'. 

But the question remains, how do you pronounce it?

HT Brilliant Maps

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