Trump’s daughter labelled ‘queen of timing’ after announcing her engagement on his final day as president
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On what was likely a big day for the Trump family – the president's last day in office after a four years of turmoil including a double impeachment, Trump’s youngest daughter had other plans.

On Tuesday, Tiffany Trump posted a photo on Instagram of herself and her new fiancé Michael Boulos – who is reportedly worth billions, according to Vanity Fair – standing in one of the White House’s colonnades.

The caption read: “It has been an honour to celebrate many milestones, historic occasions and create memories with my family here at the White House, none more special than my engagement to my amazing fiancé Michael!”

And despite the raging pandemic and recent insurrection her father incited, Tiffany insisted she is “feeling blessed and excited for the next chapter!”

While the bride-to-be received congratulations and well-wishes, many across social media couldn’t help but wonder what on earth Tiffany was doing.

“Congratulations to Tiffany Trump. You have the worst timing in history. Literally getting engaged in the Rose Garden on the deck of the Titanic,” one person wrote. “Let's take our engagement announcement photo at the house my dad is getting evicted from tomorrow!'” another person joked, pretending to be Tiffany.

Others jokingly referred to her as “the queen of timing” – thinking she wanted to get her wedding announcemeent in at the last minute before the family was forced to leave the White House the next day.

Tiffany, 27, and her fiancé — the 23-year-old heir to Nigeria-based Boulos Enterprises – met sometime during the summer of 2017 in Mykonos, Greece. Boulos posted the same engagement photo to his Instagram account saying, “Got engaged to the love of my life! Looking forward to our next chapter together.”

At least Boulos is doing ok, because we can’t imagine his father-in-law is looking forward to the future

MORE: Trump makes history as first US President to be impeached twice. What happens now?

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