It’s comforting to know that politicians and public figures aren’t immune to the same struggles of working from home we all face.

Indeed, shadow health secretary Jonathan Ashworth has become the latest victim of Zoom-bombing after his daughter made a surprise cameo during a live TV interview.

The Labour MP for Leicester South appeared on BBC News on Friday evening to discuss the Government’s “monstrous” failure to offer sick pay to Britons who have contracted coronavirus.

But he was interrupted when one of his daughters walked into the shot, cheekily grinning and waving at the camera.

Noticing her impromptu appearance, Ashworth smiled awkwardly while attempting to nudge her out of the frame.

The news anchor joked: “It’s nice to see her, we are ruining her evening by keeping her dad up talking to us on the telly.

“What’s her name? Now that you’ve introduced her.”

Ashworth chuckled at the comment and replied: “That is Annie and she’s very excited, she’s very excited because it’s been Leicester City day at school today and we’ve got Leicester City in the cup final tomorrow.”

Leicester City are due to play Chelsea at 5.15pm on Saturday in the FA Cup final at Wembley Stadium.

As Ashworth was talking, Annie reappeared and began waving at the camera again to which her father said: “Thank you” as he laughed while trying to block her from view.

Annie then returned again to wave at the viewers to which her father laughed.BBC News

The funny clip was shared to Twitter and has racked up more than 8,000 likes from delighted viewers.

They commented:

It’s not the first time Ashworth has been interrupted by one of his children live on air.

He suffered another unexpected intrusion during an interview, again with the BBC, last year.

His daughters could not wait to show their dad what they had received from their grandmother for Easter.

Ashworth laughed as he repeatedly told the girls “I’m on the TV”, likening himself to so-called “BBC dad” Professor Robert Kelly.

The academic became an international sensation in 2017 when his children stormed an interview with the BBC about South Korea.

We can all agree that cameos from kids have the power to make anyone more relatable, and we personally won’t ever get sick of them.

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