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While Americans and Brits both speak English, when it comes to insults they might as well be speaking different languages it seems - as one American has shared some offensive British words she has never come across before.

TikToker Lisa Dollan (@yorkshirepeach) is known for explaining the cultural differences between the US and UK as an American from Georgia who now lives in Yorkshire, England and she's now shared the insults she has learned since moving across the pond.

"Let's do it," she said and then revealed she had never word "w*****," and laughed before she asked: "Do I say it weird? I can't get away with saying it can I?"

Attempting the insult in a British accent she then questioned viewers whether she pronounced the word better.

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"B******," was the next word Dollan said as she let out another laugh. "Why did it take me literally like three years to realise what it even meant? I didn't even understand... I never heard that before I moved here. It's funny when you think about it, isn't it?"

While the next insult isn't as ryde as the previous words, you wouldn't want to be called a "wet lettuce." Chuckling once more, Dollan told viewers: "Maybe it's just me but I never that before I move here, but it's so perfect."

She added "Think, have you ever thought it through? How bad is wet lettuce? Has someone ever served you a salad and it's a bit soggy, there's nothing worse than a soggy salad is there?"

@yorkshirepeach

#americanintheuk


Since sharing the new British words to add to her vocabulary of insults, Dollan's video has received 1.8m views, 221,200 likes, along with thousands of comments from Brits who were keen to teach Dollan some more of our eccentric insults.

Many British people told Dollan that pretty any word can be used as an insult.

One person wrote: "One of the best insults in Britain is just ‘your mum!’"

"Literally any word in the UK is an insult. I’ve called someone a puddle," another person said.

Someone else added: "British culture is turning any word into an insult."

"My boyfriend described someone as 'the insole of a shoe once,'" a fourth person replied.

Certainly gives us Brits a new appreciation for our colourful vocabulary.

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