I gave my baby a cool, unique name — but it's illegal …
New York Post

An Australian mum has no regrets about her baby's name – despite being illegal in her area.

For context, the Registrar can in fact refuse to register a name if it happens to cause offence or is obscene. Titles and religious categories are also grey areas – which one TikToker learnt for herself.

In a viral stitch clip, Isabella Veronica Hayes, 23, responded to a clip that asked whether any mums regretted their choice of baby name.

Isabella immediately said no, explaining to her 3 million viewers that she initially wanted to call her baby 'Commodore', but discovered it was illegal because it's the title given to a high-ranking naval officer.

Instead, she added Holden before it, making him 'Holden Commodore'.

"He will be 1 [year old] very, very soon, and I do not regret it at all. I think Holden Commodore suits him perfectly," she said, before adding: "I know that people are going to probably start copying me with the name because it’s so cool."

Sign up to our free Indy100 weekly newsletter


@isabellaveronicahardy

#stitch with @Gabby Lamb I do not regret naming my child Holden commodore 😇🙌 #noregrats


Holden Commodore also doubles up as a famous car built in Australia between 1978 and 2017 – which unfortunately gave TikTokers an easy target.

"Are you guys still coming to Toyota Hilux’s birthday on Saturday? Just needing to confirm numbers," one humoured, while another added: "Please tell me you're joking!"

A third claimed to have "taught a boy called Holden, his brother was Ford, and his two younger sisters were Celica and Mercedes. " She added: "I kid you not..."

"The very last Holden Commodore made in Australia," one comedic TikToker wrote, while another comment had fellow users in hysterics, writing: "If my son is anything like me I'm gonna call him Ford falcon cause he'll break down all the time."

Have your say in our news democracy. Click the upvote icon at the top of the page to help raise this article through the indy100 rankings.


Please log in or register to upvote this article
The Conversation (0)