5 Fascinating Facts About The Godfather
Independent

You, too, might believe in America after hearing the news that Vito Corleone’s mansion from The Godfather is available for rent on Airbnb.

The iconic crime film, widely regarded as the pinnacle of the genre, is celebrating its 50th anniversary this year and it seems the festivities go beyond a mere cinema rerelease. The English Tudor home, situated in Staten Island, is available to rent for the duration of August.

The home spans over 6,200 square feet and will cost just $50 per night for the month. This affordable price is in honour of the movie’s half-century.

Do not, however, expect things to seem familiar on the inside as only the house’s exterior was used in Francis Ford Coppola’s masterpiece. It’s a disappointment familiar to anyone who’s ever visited the Cheers bar in Boston.

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The home is made up of five bedrooms and seven bathrooms with Airbnb suggesting it would ideally suit a family of two adults and three children.

In The Godfather, Don Corleone’s Long Island home most memorably features in the opening scene, a garden party wedding reception that sets the tone for all that follows.

The home was built in 1930 and most recently sold for $2.4 million in 2016 so it’s safe to say $1,500 for the month represents pretty good value. This truly is an offer you can’t refuse since the house next door served as the home of Vito’s son Michael, memorably played by Al Pacino.

The owner notes:

“This is our family home, so please read through the house rules carefully before you request to book. We’re located in a quiet neighbourhood, so please, no outside or additional guests at any time.”

So, in short, nobody should crash the party or they’ll be about as welcome as they were on the day of the Don’s daughter’s wedding.

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