This optical illusion reveals whether you're an optimist or a pessimist
Independent

An optical illusion supposedly reveals if you're left-brained or right-brained depending on what animal you see but the only thing it seems to be proving is how mind-bending it is to look at.

The popular illusion is going viral on social media once again.

Twitter user Pam posted the optical illusion with the caption, "Depending on how your brain works (left brain, right brain) you see a cat or a moose in this pattern. Whatever animal you see isn’t part of the image, just an optical illusion created by your own brain. If you zoom in on any of the features you see, the illusion disappears"

The animals within the illusion will only reveal themselves when you look at the image from further away, if you look at it too closely it just appears as swirly patterns.

While the cat seems to be fairly easy for people to find, most viewers cannot find the moose.

"I call BS, no one sees a moose," Jess replied on Twitter.

"Even with a visual aid laying out both patterns, I still can’t see the moose," a Twitter user said.

Most people agreed, nobody could see the moose. Leading some to believe there is no moose.

This optical illusion will determine if you're right-brained or left-brained based on what animal you see Twitter

Neither Pam nor the internet could give a definitive answer to which animal was associated with each side of the brain. Although some have their suspicions that the cat means people are left-brained.

The lack of clarity on each animal's meaning only convinced some users that the elusive moose was non-existent and the illusion was just meant to make people stare longer.

But no matter how long people stared at this one, nobody could seem to find the moose. Some even reported not seeing anything at all.

"I didn’t see either one, I must be brain dead, oh well. Lol," Twitter user Gregory said.

Have your say in our news democracy. Click the upvote icon at the top of the page to help raise this article through the indy100 rankings.

Please log in or register to upvote this article
The Conversation (0)