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TikToker sparks fears that Mona Lisa has been stolen

Mona Lisa hit by creamy cake at Louvre

A tourist on TikTok accidentally sparked fears that the Mona Lisa, one of the world's most famous paintings, was stolen from the Louvre Museum in Paris, France.

In a recent clip published on the platform by the account @narvanator, security trucks and police cars flashing blue lights can be seen driving throughout the city.

"POV: you're in Paris when the Mona Lisa has been stolen," the video's onscreen caption reads.

This clip, which has been viewed over 7.5 million times at the time of writing, had some people believing Leonardo da Vinci's creation landed in the hands of a thief.

@narvanator

Grus been at it again!! #fyp #fypシ #paris #paristiktok #monalisa #stolen #gru #despicableme

The legendary painting depicts Lisa del Giocondo, a silk merchant's wife.

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One person on TikTok wrote: "I DIDNT SEE TIKTOK FOR 2 HOURS AND THE MONA LISA GOT STOLEN!?!?"

"Sorry I missed the whole last book; THE MONA LISA WAS WHAT?!"

A third wrote: "WHAT MONA LISA GOT STOLEN!!!? AIN'T NO WAY/"

Someone else jokingly suggested the children's book pair Ladybug and Cat Noir, who saved the Mona Lisa, as well as the character Arsene Lupin, the "gentlemen thief," as the culprits.

"Arsene lupin or cat noir????!!!" they added.

The Louvre hasn't said anything about this video, and the painting seems to be safe and sound at the museum. Still, it isn't farfetched to think that the body of art, also known as La Gioconda, could go missing.

In 1911, Italian handyman Vincenzo Peruggia stole the painting. And as reported in CNN, it wasn't until December 1913 that Peruggia was caught, and the painting was recovered.

The painting has also been vandalised four times. One of the most recent incidents of this occurred in May 2022.

The Independent reported that a man, seemingly disguised as an older woman, threw a piece of cake at the glass protecting the painting.

The painting is one of the most viewed pieces of art at the Louvre, with thousands of tourists visiting weekly.

It is closely monitored around the clock.

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