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Gwyneth Paltrow has raised eyebrows after she admitted that she wished she would have made out with more members of the cast of Dead Poets Society on the 33rd anniversary of the films release.

The 1980s classic had an all-star cast of young up and comers in Hollywood and follows the lives of students who were being mentored by their radical and progressive English teacher John Keating, played by Robin Williams.

Amongst the cast was Ethan Hawke, who on the birthday of the film shared several throwback images of him and the rest of the cast, during filming, on his Instagram account.

The 51-year-old, who went on to star in acclaimed movies like the Before Trilogy, First Reformed and Gattaca, wrote in the caption of the post: "I stand upon my desk to remind myself that we must constantly look at things in a different way." The standing on his desk line is a reference to a moving and now iconic moment in the movie.

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In an unlikely turn of events, Gwyneth Paltrow of all people, slid into the comments and wrote this: "Best movie EVER, I wish I had made out with more of you than I did."

If that wasn't enough to raise eyebrows then just wait to see what Hawke wrote in response: "We all wish the same."

Paltrow and Hawke have only ever worked together once in a film and that was the 1998 remake of Great Expectations, where they played the film's central couple. Both were in other relationships at this point though, with Paltrow seeing Ben Affleck and Hawk was engaged to Uma Thurman.

The only other connection that Paltrow has to Dead Poets Society was with Robert Sean Leonard, with the pair having a very short lived relationship in 1994 but that's it.

Regardless, Hawke and Paltrow's thirsty comments about each other definitely got people talking.






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