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Getty Images / Pablo Cuadra / Stringer

If you somehow hadn't noticed, James McAvoy has bulked up big time.

And the internet is very excited about it.

The sudden change in appearance has led to plenty of speculation about how McAvoy worked out and what he ate.

Thankfully, the actor has stepped in to help stop any baseless claims or bogus stories circulating:

 

Seeing a lot of articles saying that I ate 6000 calories a day to get bigger and leaner. Just to set the record straight incase anyone decides to give this a go. I have never done this. The quote is taken from an interview I did for a movie called "Split",not the one I'm on right now which is called "Glass" . The interview was done at the beginning of the year and me saying "I ate 6000 calories a day" is inaccurate,was meant as a joke and is being widely used out of context. The truth is that this time around I gained more muscle weight and got leaner by not counting a single calorie. Good old @magnuslygdback had me eating a lot but nowhere near the 6000 calorie mark. In fact we didn't count a single calorie. We counted macros...I think probably a healthier way of tracking intake. I'm sure most people would never dream of copying the advice of some article/s on the internet about some actor but I know some would and id be gutted if they laboured under bad advice or worse yet seriously harmed their health. 6000 a day might work well for somebody but I've got zero experience or info on that being the case. Guys and girls in the gym and out...this IS NOT how I got the results I got.please don't copy. enjoy your workouts or non workouts.stay healthy and eat well to enjoy if you can! All the very best,James

A post shared by James Mcavoy (@jamesmcavoyrealdeal) on

No, McAvoy didn't eat 6,000 calories a day to bulk up for his role in Split and he never has.

Referring to his interview with Mr. Porter, he wrote on Instagram:

Theinterview was done at the beginning of the year and me saying "I ate 6000 calories a day" is inaccurate,was meant as a joke and is being widely used out of context.

He added:

We counted macros...I think probably a healthier way of tracking intake.

Counting macros - or macronutrients aka carbohydrates, fat and protein - means tracking the kind of calories you eat rather than how many.

McAvoy continued:

I'm sure most people would never dream of copying the advice of some article/s on the internet about some actor but I know some would and id be gutted if they laboured under bad advice or worse yet seriously harmed their health.

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