Oprah Winfrey brought the Golden Globes audience to their feet on Sunday night as only Oprah Winfrey can.

It was the first major Hollywood awards ceremony since the sexual harassment scandals that have hit the film industry, with stars wearing black to honour the victims and eight actresses bringing activists as guests.

Oprah continued the tribute to victims and activists with style.

After accepting the Cecil B DeMille Lifetime Achievement Award - as the first black women to win it - she made a rousing speech on a lifetime of social justice and activism.

She touched on her roots as a little girl in 1964, watching as Sidney Poitier became the first black man to win the Academy Award for Best Actor.

In 1982, Poitier would go on to win Cecil B DeMille Lifetime Achievement Award. Oprah said the parallel was not lost on her.

Turning her attention to the pressing issues of today, she thanked sections of the media for "uncovering the absolute truth" and told her audience that "speaking your truth is the most powerful tool we all have".

She said:

I want tonight to express gratitude to all the women who have endured years of abuse and assault because they, like my mother, had children to feed and bills to pay and dreams to pursue.

They’re the women whose names we’ll never know. They are domestic workers and farm workers. They are working in factories and they work in restaurants and in academia, and engineering, medicine and science. They are part of the world of tech and politics and in business.  They are athletes in the Olympics and they are soldiers in the military.

She continued:

 For too long women have not been heard or believed if they dared to speak their truth to the power of those men.

But their time is up… Their time is up.

She added:

So I want all the girls watching here and now to know that a new day is on the horizon!

And when that new day finally dawns, it will be because of a lot of magnificent women, many of whom are right here in this room tonight, and some pretty phenomenal men fighting hard to make sure that they become the leaders who take us to the time when nobody ever has to say ‘Me Too’ again.

Keep reading...Show less
Please log in or register to upvote this article
The Conversation (0)