More people want to leave the US under the Trump administration than the previous two presidencies

Greg Evans
Sunday 06 January 2019 16:00
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Picture:(Joshua Roberts/ Reuters/ Joe Raedle/ Saul Loeb /Getty Images)

Donald Trump is busy ranting on Twitter about trying to keep people out of the United States but maybe he should be more concerned about keeping people in his country.

According to a poll released on Friday by Gallup, 16 per cent of Americans in 2018 said that they would want to permanently leave the United States and never return.

Although the pollsters didn't ask the political leanings on those that took part it's noticeable that this is a significant increase compared to the previous two presidencies.

The average under Barack Obama was 10 per cent and was only up by one per cent on average under George W. Bush.

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This new data isn't hugely different from the stats that were released in 2017 but there were interesting divides between gender, age groups and income.

20 per cent of women said that they wished to leave the US, whereas only 13 per cent of men said the same.

The highest percentage for age groups was 15-29-year-olds with 30 per cent wishing to leave, whilst the poorer members of the population, a sector that Trump would want to appeal to, were 30 per cent in favour of leaving.

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According to Gallup, the destination for those who are feeling discontent under the Trump administration is Canada with more than one in four hoping to move north of the border, which is double the number of people who wanted to make the same move in 2016.

Whilst Gallup doesn't believe that we will soon see a wave of people leaving the country, the increase in numbers compared to previous years would indicate that the president is a major factor in people wants to migrate.

Gallup states in the conclusion to their findings:

After years of remaining flat, the number of Americans -- particularly young women -- who desire to leave the U.S. permanently is on the rise.

This increase is concerning, but none of this suggests that the U.S. is going to suddenly see a mass migration in which it could lose as many as 40% of its young women.

However, the 'Trump effect' on Americans' desire to migrate is a new manifestation of the increasing political polarisation in the U.S.

Before Trump took office, Americans' approval or disapproval of the president was not a push factor in their desire to migrate.

HT Huffington Post

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