It should come as a surprise to no one that people are not pleased to see David Cameron is back.

The former prime minister and architect of the 2016 EU referendum is set to speak in depth about his time in office next week as he promotes his memoir For the Record.

And this morning, ITV’s Tom Bradby tweeted that Cameron would “break his silence” on Monday night in a special television interview.

That post inspired a number of people to make the same joke about Cameron’s chaotic legacy.

It also provoked another wave of anger at the former politician.

If anyone is hoping for an apology for the mess the UK is in, it seems unlikely that Cameron is going to give one.

Just last week, Denys Blakeway, a film producer who recently interviewed the former PM, said he did not think Cameron was living with “great introspective regret” about his time in government.

Blakeway said:

I don’t get the sense he is deeply wounded in a traumatic way by his political career...

He will always maintain that as a politician he was doing what had to be done and was best for the country.

Not even Cameron predicted the level of chaos caused by the EU referendum.

He had initially planned to release the book in 2018, according to reports, but delayed it to avoid being a “backseat driver” while Theresa May negotiated a Brexit deal.

Now, it’s set to come out 10 days before the Conservative Party Conference with Brexit still in flux and his party stuck in a bitter civil war.

It’s also worth remembering that Cameron called the referendum to unite the Conservative Party…

We haven't heard much from him since he stepped down in 2016, but a well-tanned Cameron was adamant in January this year that he did not regret calling the referendum – although he did regret losing it…

His memoir, which will be released on 19 September, is also expected to include a withering attack on his former colleague Michael Gove.

The Sunday Times was told last year that Cameron was angry with Gove’s behaviour during the EU referendum.

A source said:

Cameron was really anti-Gove. He was saying he was a lunatic.

He had not realised quite how mad Michael Gove was until that whole incident.

He was saying he feels even more cross with Gove than Boris.

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