European politics is on fire so Donald Trump decided to make his rift with China worse
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Italian Prime Minister Matteo Renzi is the most recent of European politicians to fall foul of a referendum – in his case, over 60 per cent of Italians voted against constitutional reforms, after which he indicated he would be tending his resignation.

His resignation adds weight to reports heradling the rise of far- right populism in Europe, and while Austria chose a left-wing leader in the form of Alexander Van der Bellen in the recent elections, this appears to be a dwindling trend.

Across the pond, Donald Trump continues to redefine the meaning of diplomacy.

Earlier this week, he received a phone call from Taiwan president Tsai Ing-wen congratulating him on his election victory.

Diplomatic recognition transferred from Taiwan to China in 1979, in effect acknowledging Taiwan as part of China. His phone call broke with previous US policy, and the contentious issues of territory and Taiwan's independence was reignited as a result.

Trump claims that Tsai called him, however the conversation's implications angered Chinese politicians, who protested against the slight.

Trump’s jarring tactics continued on Monday when the President-elect sent a series of tweets criticising the country’s finances and its “massive military complex” in the South China Sea.

Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesperson Lu Kang would not comment directly on the tweets, and reiterated the economic relationship between the US and China:

The China-U.S. economic and trade relationship has over many years always been a highly mutually beneficial one, otherwise it couldn't have developed the way it has today.

Some Americans are not happy with the President-elect's insistence on Twitterplomacy:

Not happy at all.

What a time to be alive.

Picture: Ethan Miller/Getty

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