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Kim Jong-un’s younger sister Kim Yo-jong has been covered across western media for her appearance at the Winter Olympics at Pyeongchang– and some of the coverage has been favourable of the dictator's sibling.

Yo-jong ended her time at the Winter Olympics by inviting South Korean President Moon Jae-in to visit her country.

Honestly, I didn’t know I would come here so suddenly. I thought things would be strange and very different, but I found a lot of things being similar. Here’s to hoping that we could see the pleasant people [of the South] again in Pyeongchang and bring closer the future where we are one again.

CNN wrote a piece about her with the headline 'Kim Jong-un’s sister is stealing the show at the Winter Olympics', which included the line:

With a smile, a handshake and a warm message in South Korea's presidential guest book, Kim Yo-jong has struck a chord with the public just one day into the Pyeongchang Games.

A later article echoed these sentiments, with the headline ‘North Korea is winning the Olympics – and it’s not because of sports’.

And it's not just CNN.

The Washington Post published a piece referring to Yo-Jung as the "Ivanka Trump of North Korea" and calling her a "political princess".

Several other news outlets (including NBC, though they later removed the tweet) also commented on North Korea’s cheerleading team:

However, the positive coverage has irked many people, who argue that it's washing over North Korea’s brutal regime, its multiple alleged human rights abuses and constant threats of nuclear war.

Human rights activist and international lawyer Hillel Neuer tweeted:

While everyone's favourite expert on South Korea Robert E Kelly made a perfect comparison with The Simpsons (obviously).

Lots of people are echoing their sentiments.

And criticised CNN for "normalising dictatorships".

Others are reminding people that she is a strong political ally of Kim Jong-un's, and holds the position of Director of the Propaganda and Agitation Department.

Perspective, people.

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