People of all political stripes have tried to educate CNN’s Jake Tapper on the UK independent media regulator Ofcom.

The one-time colleague of Piers Morgan and well respected American journalist took to Twitter to express his misguided discontent at the government intervening in the Good Morning Britain saga regarding Meghan Markle’s interview with Oprah.

It follows after the 41,000 complaints sent to the impartial broadcast watchdog about Morgan’s on-air conduct. His tweet thread highlighted that he had a limited understanding of how television is monitored in the UK.

Ofcom outlines its self as “the regulator for the communications services that we use and rely on every day.” These include not only television but the post, telephone and other means of communication.

While it is partly government-funded, it is separate from their control.

It is stated on their website, “Our duties come from Parliament. Our priority is to look after you, and we sometimes do this by promoting competition among companies we regulate... We are independent, and funded by fees paid to us by the companies we regulate.”

Media personalities, such as journalists, presenters and comedians have all come to the regulatory body’s defence, from both sides of the political aisle to try and tell the American news anchor why his assertion was very much mistaken.

Tapper tried to bow out of the debate, however still made it a matter of opinion, instead of an incredibly mistaken conclusion, one with a wide-reaching audience that trusts his opinion.

A vital function of Ofcom is investigating complaints from viewers, which is does not always do as they take it on a case by case basis, and the case of Piers Morgan and his statement of disbelief regarding Meghan Markle’s suicidal thoughts is one that the regulatory body deemed appropriate for a deeper dive. However, ITV did not cite this investigation as the reason for Morgan’s departure from the show.

UK broadcast media has much stricter regulations than its print counterpart.

If you are experiencing feelings of distress and isolation, or are struggling to cope, The Samaritans offers support; you can speak to someone for free over the phone, in confidence, on 116 123 (UK and ROI), email jo@samaritans.org, or visit the Samaritans website to find details of your nearest branch.

If you are based in the USA, and you or someone you know needs mental health assistance right now, call National Suicide Prevention Helpline on 1-800-273-TALK (8255). The Helpline is a free, confidential crisis hotline that is available to everyone 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

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