Boris Johnson and Prince Charles all smiles ahead of Rwanda meeting
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Prince Charles has reportedly spoken about the significance of educating people on the history of the slave trade, saying he wants it to be taught as widely in British schools as the Holocaust.

The 73-year-old reportedly wants to address a lack of awareness about slavery, which saw Britain displace 3.1 million African people from 1640 to 1807.

He is also said to believe that people in general aren’t as aware of Britain’s prominent role in slavery as he believes they should be.

Prince Charles is a patron of the Holocaust Memorial Day Trust, and he also reportedly thinks that the UK should create a national day to commemorate the victims of slavery, in a similar way to how Holocaust Memorial Day commemorates the victims of the Holocaust.

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The royal source told The Sunday Telegraph: "The Prince notes that in the UK, at a national level, we now know and learn at school all about the Holocaust. That is not true of the transatlantic slave trade... and there’s an acknowledgment that it needs to happen."

The heir to the throne has reportedly spoken about the importance of educationLuke Dray/Getty Images

The source also stressed that Prince Charles didn’t want to 'dictate' education policy, but he wanted to encourage the public to take responsibility for their own knowledge of the slave trade.

It comes after Prince Charles privately described the government’s policy of sending migrants to Rwanda as “appalling”, according to reports.

Charles was heard expressing opposition to home secretary Priti Patel’s plans several times in private, and was “more than disappointed”.

Meanwhile, a Cabinet minister said it is “fine” for Prince Charles to have accepted a suitcase containing €1m in cash from a controversial Qatari politician.

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