Back in 2016, when Brexit was still all anyone could talk about, Nigel Farage released an anti-immigration advert that was so offensive it was reported to the police.

The poster was compared to extremist literature and propaganda of the 1930s. It allegedly showed a group of migrants walking through the countryside with the slogan "Breaking Point" and a tagline reading "the EU has failed us all".

Picture:Picture: Stefan Wermuth/ Reuters

Farage, obviously, dismissed the suggestions at the time, insisting that the photo portrayed the "consequences" of Angela Merkel's announcement that she was opening up Germany's borders to refugees from the Syrian war.

Last night, on a special edition of BBC's Question Time, when the poster was mentioned, Farage said

The truth can be horrible, can't it?

Labour politician Angela Rayner then stepped in, asking him if he was going to apologise and pointing out that the poster "wasn't the truth".

She said that the poster did not portray migrants, that Farage was a "disgrace" and trying to "dog whistle racism", a comment that got loud cheers from the audience.

"Stop peddling hate!" she added, attempting to force him to apologise. Farage thanked Rayner sarcastically and accused her of "prejudice".

Rayner's no-holds-barred approach has got her praise online as well as from the Question Time audience, with many people commending her for taking a hardline approach and calling Farage a disgrace.

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