Spring Statement: The key points from Rishi Sunak's mini budget from fuel ...
Indy

Sunak is in a good mood about his spring statement but he is pretty much on his own .

As per Politics Home's Adam Payne, Sunak reportedly said it was a "good, happy day" after he left the 1922 committee of backbench Tory MPs the evening after delivering the mini-budget in which he cut fuel duty, increased the national insurance threshold but increased national insurance contributions to pay for health and social care, and issued platitudes about eventually cutting tax in 2024 (just before the next potential general election, we wonder why...).

With inflation soaring, and the Office of Budgetary Responsibility warning that Brits are facing "the biggest fall in living standards" since records began, the mini-budget hasn't received much praise.

Not least because one of the public's major concerns is the soaring cost of their energy bills, which the statement didn't cover and the RAC have said the 5p cut to fuel duty doesn't begin to address people's budgetary concerns.

All this and more was reflected in the newspapers, of course, which regardless of their political allegiance ripped Sunak into shreds and pointed out the issues Brits will face moving forward.

Here's a rundown of how the nationals covered the mini-budget:

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The Independent: UK faces biggest fall in living standards on record



The Daily Express: THE FORGOTTEN MILLIONS SAY: WHAT ABOUT US?



The Guardian: Cost of living surges: and Sunak squeezes poorest




The Daily Telegraph: 'The biggest fall in living standards on record'



Daily Mail: NOW SLASH TAXES EVEN FURTHER



The Financial Times: Sunak banks windfall for pre-election tax cut as cost of living crisis hits home



The Mirror: THANKS FOR NOTHING



The Times: Biggest fall in living standards since 1950s



The i: Biggest hit to living standards since age of rationing




The Metro: NO HEAT TO EAT



Pundits and journalists were even surprised by how negative the coverage was:

It appears the media is aligned with public opinion. A snap poll by YouGov found that 69 per cent believe the government has not done enough to help with the cost of living crisis and 42 per cent say the policies won't benefit them very much.

At least the statement proved rich for photo ops.

A "happy day" indeed...

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