The great irony of Theresa May becoming prime minister after Brexit

Bethan McKernan@mck_beth
Tuesday 12 July 2016 11:30
news
Picture: PAUL ELLIS/AFP/Getty Images

So. After all that, home secretary Theresa May is going to be our new prime minister on Wednesday.

The 52 per cent have had their say: they voted Leave to take back control and stick it to the metropolitan elite.

It is only fitting, then, that an Oxbridge educated veteran MP, former chair of the Conservative Party, longest serving home secretary since 1822 and Vote Remain supporter will be in office to guide us out of the European Union.

The far right are furious over the installation of May as an unelected PM thanks to Andrea Leadsom dropping out of the Tory leadership race on Monday.

Ukip and Britain First were among those who were publicly backing Leadson's leadership bid.

Paul Golding called May a "gormless traitor" and "friend of Islam" who presides over "soft police forces" in a video endorsing her rival.


(May's office came up with the infamous 'go home' immigration billboards, her stance on refugees was called "chilling and bitter" by the Refugee Council last year, and she has cracked down on police corruption. But sure.)

And while in a speech just before Leadsom pulled out May said that "Brexit means Brexit", Ukip are reporting a surge in membership on the back of their new campaign, "Ensure Leave means Leave."

In short: no one's happy. Except Theresa May, probably.

Picture: Dan Kitwood/Getty Images

More: Andrea Leadsom quit the Tory leadership race and everyone is pointing out this irony

More: The unbearably awkward moment Angela Eagle realises all the journalists have already left her leadership bid launch

Trending