Donald Trump is facing growing criticism after the president posted a series of racist tweets aimed at four congresswomen, including Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Ilhan Omar.

In an attempt to defend himself, the president posted a tweet on Tuesday, claiming that he 'doesn't have a racist bone in his body' after congress determined that Trump's comments were discriminatory, following a vote on Capitol Hill.

At this point, barely anyone is doubting that what Trump said was racist and his claim about not having a 'racist bone in his body' is as convincing as his claim of being 'great looking and smart'.

Just in case you needed any more proof that Trump's rhetoric is racist, here is a video of him talking to Congress way back in October 1993, where he used blatantly discriminatory language when talking about planning permission being approved for Native American-owned casinos that would have been in direct competition with his casinos in Atlantic City, New Jersey.

On a purely business standpoint, Trump feared that these new casinos would eat away at his own business, but, during his testimony, he used the kind of rhetoric that we have become used to from the New York property magnate.

In a clip that has recently been shared by MSNBC, a much younger Trump tells Democratic congressman George Miller that he doesn't believe that many of those that have been given permission to build casinos are actually Native Americans.

Miller asks Trump by quoting something which he allegedly said:

Is this you discussing Indian blood: 'We are going to judge people by whether they have Indian blood', whether they are qualified to run a gaming casino or not?

Trump responds by saying that the quote could be from him:

That probably is me, absolutely, because I’ll tell you what, if you look - if you look at some of the reservations that you have approved - you, sir, in your great wisdom, have approved - will tell you right now, they don’t look like Indians to me, and they don’t look like Indians.

Now maybe we say politically correct or not politically correct. They don’t look like Indians to me, and they don’t look like Indians to Indians, and a lot of people are laughing at it, and you are telling how tough it is, how rough it is, to get approved.

Well, you go up to Connecticut, and you look. Now, they don’t look like Indians to me, sir.

Miller, quite clearly shocked by Trump's comments, admonishes the future president for his bigoted remarks.

Thank God that’s not the test of whether or not people have rights in this country, whether or not they pass your look test

You know where we’ve heard this discussion before? ‘They don’t look Jewish to me. They don’t look Indian to me. They don’t look Italian to me’.

That was the test for whether people could go into business or not, whether they could get a bank loan. ‘You’re too black, you’re not black enough.’

According to News Maven, a written transcript of Trump's appearance on the Dom Imus Show (a syndicated radio talk programme) was also read out at the testimony, featuring a line where Trump claims to have more Indian blood than some 'so-called Indians'.

Well, I think I might have more Indian blood than a lot of the so-called Indians that are trying to open up the reservations.

I looked at one of them – well, I won’t go into the whole story, but I can tell you, I said to him, 'I think I have more Indian blood in me than you have in you.'

 And he laughed at me and he sort of acknowledged that I was right. But it’s a joke. It’s really a joke.

Imus, a man who is no stranger to controversy, added that he has seen Indians who 'look like Michael Jordan' to which Trump adds.

I think if you’ve ever been up there, you would truly say that these are not Indians.

One of them was telling me his name is Chief Running Water Sitting Bull, and I said, 'That’s a long name.' He said, “'ell, just call me Ricky Sanders.' So this is one of the Indians.

HT news.com.au

Keep reading...Show less
Please log in or register to upvote this article
The Conversation (0)