Nasa climate scientist weeps at protest over climate crisis
Twitter

NASA thinks that it has worked out the best way of attracting the attention of aliens, and it's by sending nudes into outer space.

The agency is planning to launch naked pictures of humans into the depths of the galaxy in a bid to lure aliens to us, The Sun reports.

Rather than actual photographs, though, they're pixellated drawings of a naked man and woman with a DNA model by their side. A message is also being sent containing a description of gravity.

The drawings are depicted as friendly, too, with the man and woman depicted waving in a bit to attract intelligent alien species.

Sign up to our free Indy100 weekly newsletter

It comes as part of a project called the Beacon in the Galaxy (BITG) which is attempting to communicate with intelligent life in the universe.

It's all being sent in the form of a binary code, and it’s not the first time naked depictions of humans have been used to try and communicate in such a way.

The new images are being sent into spaceNASA

The 1972 Pioneer 10 and 1973 Pioneer 11 missions both featured drawings on naked humans attached to the antennas on the crafts.

The new study explains: “Though the concept of mathematics in human terms is potentially unrecognizable to extra-terrestrial intelligence, binary is likely universal across all intelligence.

“Binary is the simplest form of mathematics as it involves only two opposing states: zero and one, yes or no, black or white, mass or empty space,” it continued.

“The proposed message includes basic mathematical and physical concepts to establish a universal means of communication followed by information on the biochemical composition of life on Earth, the Solar System’s time-stamped position in the Milky Way relative to known globular clusters, as well as digitized depictions of the Solar System, and Earth’s surface.”

Have your say in our news democracy. Click the upvote icon at the top of the page to help raise this article through the indy100 rankings.

Please log in or register to upvote this article
The Conversation (0)