BADMINTON-OLY-2020-2021-TOKYO

China's Chen Qingchen reacts after winning her women's doubles badminton group stage match with China's Jia Yifan against South Korea's Kim So-yeong and South Korea's Kong Hee-yong during the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games at the Musashino Forest Sports Plaza in Tokyo on July 27, 2021.

AFP via Getty Images

A Chinese Olympic badminton player has gone viral in China due to her non-stop swearing during one of her matches.

Chen Qingchen, 24, couldn’t hide her emotions when she played with teammate Jia Yifan against South Korea in the women’s doubles match on Tuesday.

The profanities began when China lost the first game and as a result Chen could be heard cursing using the term “cao,” which means “f**k” in Mandarin Chinese, VICE first reported.

As the second game got underway, Chen scored a point after thrashing it into the opponents side of the court.

Obviously pumped by her latest win, Chen shouted: “Wo Cao! Awesome! Cao!”

Again, Chen used an expletive “Wo Cao” which means “I f**k” before shouting “Cao” once more when a video review went in her team’s favour to secure China an extra point.

But it wasn’t just her own great shots she cheered on, Chen was just as animated when the Korean pair gifted her team a point after their shot went outside the boundaries.

BADMINTON-OLY-2020-2021-TOKYOChina's Chen Qingchen reacts after winning her women's doubles badminton group stage match with China's Jia Yifan against South Korea's Kim So-yeong and South Korea's Kong Hee-yong during the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games at the Musashino Forest Sports Plaza in Tokyo on July 27, 2021.AFP via Getty Images

In a mix of Mandarin Chinese and English, she exclaimed: “Ah lucky, lucky, lucky!”

“Wo Cao! Wo Cao! Wo Cao, Cao, Cao!” she shouted in excitement when she and Jia increased China’s lead to 8-3 in the last of the three games.

Chen’s swearing tactic seems to work pretty well for her as she and her teammate defeat South Korea’s Kim So-Yeong and Kong Hee-Yong to advance to the quarterfinals.

The Olympians passionate performance has won the hearts of fans back home in China who would have enjoyed hearing Chen’s swearing on state television as the match was a live event being aired.

Clips of Chen’s cursing have circulated on popular social media website Weibo and already have received over 100,000 shares.

Since her sweary performance, Chen posted an apology on Weibo and said her “bad pronunciation” caused a “misunderstanding.”

She wrote: “Actually I was giving myself encouragement for scoring. I didn’t expect that my bad pronunciation probably caused misunderstanding for everyone.”

“I’m getting nervous. Thank you for your support. I will also adjust my pronunciation.” She didn’t say what she had meant to shout instead of “cao.”

Some didn’t believe Chen didn’t have to apologise for anything.

Fans jokingly devised a cover for the sports star and claimed Chen was saying the English term “watch out,” rather than “Wo Cao” as the two sound similar in pronunciation.

Though Chen is not the first Olympian to swear at the Tokyo Olympics - on Monday British swimmer dropped an F-bomb during a live interview after he won a gold medal in 100-meter breaststroke.

Meanwhile, another swimmer - this time Australian Kaylee McKeown similarly used an F-word when she won the 100-meter backstroke on Tuesday.

Honestly... after winning at the Olympics, who can blame them?

Swearing appears to be a gray area for The International Olympics Committee who do not have detailed rules on this.

We imagine Chen certainly won’t be the last athlete to swear during in these Olympic Games.

Please log in or register to upvote this article
The Conversation (0)