Gwyneth Paltrow reveals Goop’s ‘luxury diaper’ was a publicity stunt
Video

American actress and businesswoman Gwyneth Paltrow launched Goop, a wellness and lifestyle brand and company, in September 2008.

It began as a weekly e-mail newsletter that gave new-age advice on things but later on, they created a website and expanded to e-commerce, collaborating with various fashion brands, launching pop-up shops, a print magazine, and two docuseries for Netflix called The Goop Lab, and the spin-off Sex, Love & Goop.

Despite this, the lifestyle and wellness brand faced criticism for its products and treatments for being harmful, lacking efficacy, or based in pseudoscience.

And, in the wake of news of Gwyneth Paltrow's exploding vagina candle (which must be read to be believed) we've rounded up seven of the most bizarre products from Goop.

Sign up to our new free Indy100 weekly newsletter

The jewel-encrusted alpaca-wool nappies called Diapérs

Recently, the company announced that it would be selling a $120 set of jewel-encrusted, alpaca wool disposable diapers, which caused some outrage from people.

"Meet The Diapér. Our new disposable diaper lined with virgin alpaca wool and fastened with amber gemstones, known for their ancient emotional-cleansing properties," read a post from the brand's official Instagram.

"Infused with a scent of jasmine and bergamot for a revitalized baby. Dropping tomorrow at 11 a.m. EST at $120 for a pack of 12."

Paltrow addressed "the outrage" toward her Goop diaper promotion and admitted that it was a publicity stunt to bring awareness to how expensive diapers are.

"Goop launched a luxury disposable diaper at $120 for a pack of 12, and there was a lot of outrage. Good. It was designed to piss us off. Because if treating diapers like a luxury makes you mad, so should taxing them like a luxury."

The Goop founder also asked her followers on Instagram to donate to the nonprofit Baby2Baby, which is trying to abolish the tax.

The vagina candle

In 2020, Paltrow was in the headlines after releasing $75 "This Smells Like My Vagina" and "This Smells Like My Orgasm" candles - and it caused some eruptions, so to speak, for consumers.

For instance, a woman named Jody Thompson penned her January 2021 experience of the candle exploding in The Guardian and said that she won the candle during a work quiz and decided to try it out.

"I trimmed the wick as instructed and put it on a candle coaster in our front room. It smelled really nice – of bergamot, cedarwood and rose," Thompson wrote.

She then continued on to say that "all hell was unleashed" and that within a few minutes after she lit the candle, flames erupted.

"Flames roared half a metre out of the jar, and bits of molten wax flew out as it fizzed and spat. We couldn't get near it to blow it out as the flames were so ferocious, and we didn't want to throw water on it for fear of splashing molten wax everywhere. Luckily, I had placed it on concrete, at the base of what was once a fireplace."

Thompson further said that "a concerned Goop HQ got in touch, offering to send goodies by way of an apology," but she didn't get to hear from Paltrow herself.

A libido-boosting product

Paltrow introduced DTF, a supplement that is designed to boost female libido.

"We're not ashamed to say we want help shifting our sex drive into gear. We also know we're not alone: Everyday stress and anxiety, hormonal fluctuations, and fatigue can all impact female libido and sexual health. (It's wild out here.)," the company's website reads.

"Our science and research team set out to create a supplement to help—something we could add to our sexual-wellness toolkit to help address some of those common physiological roadblocks to desire."

It's all about the Goop vibrations

On Valentine's Day in February 2021, the company released its first vibrator. Paltrow joked that she "had to pass the time" some way or another during the coronavirus pandemic.

Goop also announced the launch the same day and teased, "We've tested a lot of vibrators over the years — a job we take seriously, knowing that great vibrators lead to great orgasms. Basically, it's a pleasure."

The bio-frequency stickers

On the company's website, they said their $120 "bio-frequency stickers" pinpoint the body's energy imbalances utilising the same conductive carbon material NASA uses to line the spacesuits.

However, NASA shot the claim down and said they don't use that kind of material for its equipment.

"Wow. What a load of BS this is," a formerchief scientist at NASA's human research division told Gizmodo.

A Goop spokesperson said that they didn't formally endorse the stickers, and "based on the statement from NASA, we've gone back to the company to inquire about the claim and removed the claim from our site until we get additional verification."

Psychic vampire repellent spray

If you're being attacked by psychic vampires seeking to drain your energy, Goop has the spray for you.

The company promises to "banish bad vibes" and shield your "aura" from the people who try to infringe.

When it comes to the science behind the product, it uses "gem elixirs," which "work on a vibrational level."

The ingredients include things such as essential oils, sonically tuned water, bloodstone, reiki, sound waves, moonlight, and reiki-charged crystals.

But the main ingredient listed on the back is "love."

Love is all you need, aye?

The infamous jade egg

Back in 2018, Goop paid $145,000 for its claims that the egg could "balance hormones, regulate menstrual cycles, prevent uterine prolapse, and increase bladder control."

Although it still sells the eggs, the company isn't allowed to make medically unconfirmed statements.

In a report from Health.com, they spoke with several experts who advised people to steer clear of the Jade egg.

Have your say in our news democracy. Click the upvote icon at the top of the page to help raise this article through the indy100 rankings.

Please log in or register to upvote this article
The Conversation (0)