The President of PETA says pet owners should not use the word ...
ITV

People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) has taken things to new levels during its latest protest against eating meat, by barbecuing a ‘baby’ in its latest disturbing publicity stunt.

The organisation staged the unusual display in Surfers Paradise, Queensland, which saw a protester dressed as a chef stood next to a sign that read “Babies Don’t Belong on the BBQ – Leave Lambs Alone”.

A doll was laid on the BBQ next to vegetables, with the uncomfortable image marking one of the strongest demonstrations organised by PETA over recent times.

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“When it comes to their capacity to suffer and feel pain and fear, a lamb is no different from a human baby,” PETA campaigns adviser Mimi Bekhechi said.

“PETA urges everyone who’s repulsed by the prospect of chowing down on a newborn to consider that eating a baby sheep is equally appalling and go vegan.”

The stunt left passers by shockedPETA

The organisation is continuing its protestations against the meat industry, likening baby lambs to human babies.

The stunt left passers by shocked as PETA looks to influence people’s dietary choices over Easter weekend.

It’s hardly the first PETA campaign to raise a few eyebrows, though.

It's the latest provocative stunt from PETAPETA

People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) love to make a splash with controversial advertisements, and their latest one is no different. But it seems that viewers are taking the advertisement in the opposite direction of what PETA intended.

On PETA's Twitter, the animal rights advocacy group posted a graphic asking dog owners to not use prong collars on their pets as they are painful and dangerous earlier this year.

The clip also includes a rendering of a human wearing a prong collar attached to a leash as a dog angrily drags them.

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