Tonga: Footage Of Devastating Aftermath Of Volcanic Eruption And Tsunami 5
Indy TV

Last month, we saw the devastating eruption of the Hunga-Tonga-Hunga-Ha’apai volcano that filled the skies with ash in the South Pacific.

Now, conspiracy theorists are speculating that the natural disaster was caused by something more sinister.

At the time, videos filled social media of waves crashing into the island and people running, trying their best to remain safe. Tsunami warnings were quickly issued and according to NPR, NASA scientists now believe that the eruption was "500 times as powerful as the nuclear bomb dropped on Hiroshima, Japan, at the end of World War II."

But in a TikTok, one person theorised that there was more to the event than met the eye—and their fellow conspiracy theorists seemed to agree in the comments.

Showing satellite imagery of the eruption visible from space, TikTok user @sunnyred55 purports that a mysterious white object flew into the volcano just before the eruption.

“Something ain’t right,” he says. “You know, somebody did this to these folks.”

“Something ain’t right,” a narrator on the video says. “You know, somebody did this to these folks.”#China #us #wakeup #foryourpage #forupage #foru #nato #russia #fyp #duet #tonga #attack #hungatonga #saveyourself #tsunami #tongavolcano #lies #lie

@sunnyred55

#China #us #wakeup #foryourpage #forupage #foru #nato #russia #fyp #duet #tonga #attack #hungatonga #saveyourself #tsunami #tongavolcano #lies #lie

#China #us #wakeup #foryourpage #forupage #foru #nato #russia #fyp #duet #tonga #attack #hungatonga #saveyourself #tsunami #tongavolcano #lies #lie

One sceptic, in particular, claimed that the eruption was caused by a secret “kinetic weapon.”

Others in the comments went as far as suggesting that the TikTok user was now in danger for exposing the “truth” about the situation.

“Be careful brother,” one user wrote. “These people will search you out for exposing them.”

They are creating these natural disasters to be able to make it like we need the government to step in to take control,” another user said. “These are not natural disasters.”

Of course, the claim has no real truth to it and can be easily debunked as nothing more than a conspiracy theory.

One person on Twitter shared that the sped-up footage spans a 6-hour period, and not seconds as the TikTok makes it seem.

The assertion from the TikTok is not only untrue, but shows how dangerous conspiracy theories can be for promoting fear mongering.

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