Picture:
Picture:
Jeff Spicer/Getty Images/Twitter

Britain First are on a bit of a cold streak.

Earlier this month they attempted to 'invade' a book shop in Birmingham, and completely failed to sew division in the community.

Earlier this week, the group's leader Paul Golding tweeted a video of British Pakistanis celebrating a cricket victory in 2009, claiming they were Muslim Londoners celebrating a terrorist attack in the city.

On St. George's day - which we should note celebrates the patron saint of England, a Turkish-born soldier to a Palestinian Mother who lived in the Middle East and died at the hands of the Romans - Golding tweeted Gary Lineker angrily.

Gary was presumably chosen either because he's a household name with 80 England football caps and 48 goals to his name, who often speaks positively about mulitculturalism, or because he's big on Twitter, with over 5.8 million followers.

Or because he couldn't level the same accusation at Muslim Mayor of London Sadiq Khan:

Anyway, Gary quickly put him in his place.

People loved it:

People were also quick to point out Paul rushed out the tweet at 11.56 am.

He really wanted to get the accusation in, before this sort of tweet from Lineker:

Only around one in five adults in England celebrate St. George's Day, and only 6 per cent could correctly identify the reason for his fame and sainthood - his martyrdom for refusing to persecute Christians.

Britain's churchgoing Christian population is less than two per cent of the Country's total population.

Half the UK do not regard themselves as religious and 56 per cent who belong to a religion or were brought up religious say they never attend services or meetings.

The importance of religion to the population has been declining for decades and continues to do so.

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