Anti-vaccination protesters tried to serve so-called legal papers to former England football captain Alan Shearer - but they went to the wrong home.

Shearer, a former Newcastle United and Blackburn Rovers striker, had encouraged people to get a Covid-19 booster shot in a video shared by the Premier League last Friday.

“If you are eligible, get your booster booked as soon as possible for the best possible defence against Covid for you and your family,” Shearer said.

Sign up to our new free Indy100 weekly newsletter

Shearer’s sentiments caused the protesters to film themselves outside a home near Newcastle that they thought he resided in.

The video, which was uploaded to Twitter, shows three men and a woman grouped outside of a gated property.

One of the men pressed an electronic buzzer. The same man then put the “legal papers” into the external letterbox present.

”Everyone is going to get this, every celebrity, sick of yous. Just causing more trouble for us, lies, all lying,” said the man who placed the documents in the letterbox.

“That’s the truth in that letterbox there, in Alan Shearer’s f****** house.”

Northumbria Police said it wasn’t involved in this incident.

It isn’t transparent as to what exactly the papers said, but anti-vaccination protesters generally share templates of alleged legal documents that they record themselves depositing.

According to the PA news agency, a person who lives in the area saw the footage and said: “That’s an old address they have for him.”

Once other people saw the video on Twitter, they didn’t hesitate to comment.

“Another example of people ‘doing their own research’ it’s not even his house. You couldn’t make it up. Nothing more dangerous than a stupid person that thinks they’re clever,” someone wrote.

“I refuse to believe these clowns aren’t actors,” another added.

Even Shearer’s fellow Match of the Day presenter Gary Lineker took to his Twitter to respond to the situation.

This isn’t the first time anti-vaccine protesters went to the wrong location for a demonstration.

In August, a group of protesters attempted to storm BBC headquarters, only to be at a different building. The corporation had moved out in 2013.

Instead of targeting BBC’s news operation, which they held accountable for encouraging Covid-19 vaccines, some of the protesters had attempted to access to Television Centre in west London following a gathering at Shepherd’s Bush Green organised by Official Voice, an anti-lockdown group.

And in October, BBC presenter Jeremy Vine shared videos on Twitter of the protesters who tried to serve him with an “anti-vaxx writ.”

Please log in or register to upvote this article
The Conversation (0)