PICTURE:
PICTURE:
People's Vote/Twitter

Ever since the referendum result in 2016, we have heard some pretty powerful and emotive speeches from different people.

As the (constantly moving) deadline for the UK to leave Europe looms every closer it's fair to say that we're becoming somewhat inunindated with passionate calls for Remain, or Leave. Some tedious, some awe-inspiring and some just plane confusing.

The latest from Labour MP of West Bromwich, Betty Boothroyd is currently getting attention for all the right reasons after she spoke out about why we must have a People's Vote on Brexit.

In a video posted on social media Boothroyd, who was also House Speaker from 1992 to 2000, said:

Look here, my concern is about young people. I have no children, no grandchildren. My quality of life is not going to be disturbed. It's the young people today whose quality of life in a few years time is just going to deteriorate. It is up to them to make decisions about the future of this country and where we go. It is the most important decision that I think has ever been made.

She stresses that people should always have the chance to reflect on a decision that has been made (voting Leave):

David Cameron has a lot to answer for. He brought this country to the state that it is in the present time. I'm not saying it was a wrong decision. I'm saying to them, look at it again. We've had two years now of letting it be known what will happen with Brexit.

Speaking on the rise of Fascism today, Boothroyd who is 89 years old, said:

I saw war-torn Europe and what extremism, what Fascism had done to it. I fought the national front in West Bromwich. I know what they're like. We can all do it, we're not cowards. It is not a country of cowards.

She finishes her plea with a powerful quote, noting:

A democracy is a nation that allows its people to change its mind. If it doesn't, its no longer a democracy.

People flocked to social media to praise the former Labour MP for her articulate and meaningful words, which seem to have resonated with many.

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