People are sharing stories of being helped through depression - and the results are powerful

Lowenna Waters
Saturday 09 June 2018 11:15
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Picture:(PeopleImages / iStock by Getty )

People are sharing the times someone else kept them going through their depression - and the results are powerful.

Last week, two high profile celebrities reportedly took their own lives after suffering from depression.

Yesterday, Anthony Bourdain, the celebrity chef, was found dead in a hotel room in Strasbourg, France, where he had been working on an upcoming episode of his programme Parts Unknown.

On June 5th, fashion designer Kate Spade was found unresponsive in her New York apartment after an apparent suicide. She was only 55 years of age.

In response, Twitter user Ana Marie Cox asked people to share stories of times that other people's kindness has helped to get them through a deep depression.

The response she got was incredible.

After reading the powerful stories, Ana Marie noticed a theme, they all started with the simple three words, "are you ok?" Writing to her 1.3million followers, she said:

It is amazing how many of these stories turn on someone simply asking with sincerity, "are you ok?" That one question -- three short words! -- can cross an abyss.

After people asked whether others were ok, she then noticed how important it was for those with depression to answer honestly.

The other half of these stories is just as important: when that someone sincerely asked, "Are you ok?," the person in pain answered honestly.

Everyone can be that person that asks--you can also be that person that answers. We need you both in this world.

She then finished the thread by imploring people to help other people if they think they might be struggling.

Call a friend you haven't seen in awhile?

Buy lunch for the person behind you in line?

Give to a charity, do a chore for a loved one... Smile on the street.

Just be present in the next meeting you're in.

Service is everywhere.

If you have been affected by this article, you can contact the following organisations for support:

More: People with depression use language differently – here's how to spot it

More: The test used to diagnose depression might not work on black people

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