An anti-racism protest against President-elect Donald Trump winning the American election, outside the U.S. embassy in London
An anti-racism protest against President-elect Donald Trump winning the American election, outside the U.S. embassy in London
AP

Donald Trump’s state visit this summer has understandably divided opinion in the UK, and angered many. So much so, that more than 1.8m people have signed a petition demanding that the Government cancel it, on the grounds that “it would cause embarrassment to Her Majesty the Queen”. A rival petition saying Mr Trump should come has just over 300,000 signatures.

If more than 100,000 people sign a petition, then it has to be debated in Parliament. This means our MPs will get a second chance to make their views clear on Mr Trump, after a similar petition demanding he be banned from Britain gained almost 600,000 signatures in January 2016.

This led to a memorable debate, where MPs took various pot shots at Mr Trump. This was often done in a very British way, with some calling him a “buffoon” and a “wazzock”.

The latest debate will likely be much more serious now Mr Trump is somehow US President, but should still be just as memorable. So here is all you need to know

When will MPs debate the Donald Trump petition?

The debate will take place at 4.30pm (GMT) on Monday 20 February.

How can I watch it?

Once it starts you can watch it live on BBC Parliament here: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b08hdnkv

Will it make any difference?

In short, no. Many MPs may voice their disapproval towards Mr Trump, but Theresa May has been very clear – the Government will not back down from their invitation to the US President.

However, this doesn’t mean that MPs are completely powerless. As House of Commons Speaker John Bercow proved when he barred Mr Trump from addressing MPs, some still have the power to limit Mr Trump’s visit.

The debate can also have a long-term impact too. With protests in Westminster also planned to coincide with the debate, it should help keep the anti-Trump momentum going, and help further solidify UK opposition to the US President.

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