Just over a quarter of people (27 per cent) think GB News is biased, compared to 42 per cent who think BBC News is, a poll has revealed. Well, a poll commissioned by GB News themselves, that is.

In news which is not really news when you think about it, The Telegraph also reported that one in three people (34 per cent) surveyed by research company CT Group branded the corporation as “woke” – a term meaning “alert to injustice” which has since been used as a pejorative adjective by right-wingers.

Writing on Twitter, Insider reporter Henry Dyer noted that the chief executive of CT Group is none other than Lynton Crosby, an Australian political strategist noted for helping Boris Johnson to win two successive terms as Mayor of London, and assisting David Cameron to secure a victory in the 2015 general election.

Dyer also went on to add that CT Group isn’t even a member of the British Polling Council, which “promotes transparency in polling”. Its president is Professor John Curtice, a pollster well-known for appearing on BBC News during their coverage of general elections.

The integrity of the poll, reportedly of 1,000 people, has since been scrutinised and ridiculed by Twitter users online:

Others questioned the legitimacy of the headline, with others noting that there was a lack of detail about what questions people were actually add. One Twitter user also pointed out that the survey refers to people “thinking” that the news service is biased, which isn’t the same as a fact:

This isn’t the first time that GB News has been mocked for poor statistics, either, after people ridiculed its statement that “most of our viewers live outside London”.

It’s a fact which sounds impressive, until you realise that only 13.4 per cent of the UK’s total population lives inside London – according to Eurostat research from 2019.

People have since poked fun at the news channel’s tweet, given its presenters often criticise what they call the “metropolitan elite”:

Essentially, GB News should probably stop commissioning and analysing data, stat.

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